Science Highlights

Snakes on a plane: This atomic-resolution simulation of a peptoid nanosheet reveals a snake-like structure never seen before. The nanosheet’s layers include a water-repelling core (yellow), peptoid backbones (white), and charged sidechains (magenta and cyan). The right corner of the nanosheet’s top layer has been “removed” to show how the backbone’s alternating rotational states give the backbones a snake-like appearance (red and blue ribbons). Surrounding water molecules are red and white.06.06.16Science Highlight

Understanding and Predicting Self-Assembly

Newly discovered “design rule” brings nature-inspired nanostructures one step closer. Read More »

A high-resolution photo shows the inside of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak with a representative cross-section of a fusion plasma superimposed.05.20.16Science Highlight

Supercomputers Predict New Turbulent Interactions in Fusion Plasmas

Cutting-edge simulations provide an explanation for a mystery over half a century old. Read More »

Selective etching of palladium (blue) from palladium-platinum core-shell nanoparticles (left) yields hollow platinum (grey) nanocages with high activity for the oxygen reduction reaction.04.30.16Science Highlight

Hollow and Filled with Potential

Hollow shape-selected platinum nanocages represent a new class of highly active catalysts. Read More »

The orange carotenoid protein of cyanobacteria binds a single carotenoid pigment molecule that may dissipate excess light energy when it moves within the protein.04.30.16Science Highlight

Changing Colors for Built-in Sunblock

Molecular movements triggered by light redirect the flow of energy through photosynthetic cells to protect them from sun damage. Read More »

MD simulation shows membranes with an asymmetric molecular distribution of about 0.6 nm; yellow = gold; red = organo-thiol ligand molecules.03.31.16Science Highlight

Janus-like Nanoparticle Membranes

Sub-nanometer molecular asymmetry between the two different faces of nanoparticle membranes formed at air-water interface is revealed. Read More »

Conceptual art connects the atomic underpinnings of the neutron-rich calcium-48 nucleus with the Crab Nebula, which has a neutron star at its heart.02.29.16Science Highlight

What Is the Size of the Atomic Nucleus?

The neutron skin of the nucleus calcium-48 is much thinner than previously thought. Read More »

Researchers from the Molecular Foundry, working with users from Columbia University led by Latha Venkataraman, have created the world’s highest-performance single-molecule diode using a combination of gold electrodes and an ionic solution.11.01.15Science Highlight

Viable Single-Molecule Diodes

Major milestone in molecular electronics scored by Molecular Foundry and Columbia University team. Read More »

Visualized model of a superlubricity (low-friction) system: gold = nanodiamond particles; red = graphene nanoscroll; green = underlying graphene on silica; black = diamond-like carbon surface.10.01.15Science Highlight

Near Zero Friction from Nanoscale Lubricants

Researchers have attained superlubricity, the near absence of friction, at a carbon-silica interface using nanodiamonds wrapped in graphene flakes. Read More »

Understanding the conditions and pathways that position populations of isolated ions and shared proton species as they react in water allows scientists to better understand the chemistry of concentrated hydrogen chloride solutions, which has implications in chemical processes ranging from refining oil to building longer-lasting batteries.08.01.15Science Highlight

Keeping the Ions Close: A New Activity

Study changes perception on how acids behave in water. Read More »

Million molecule simulation of ice formation in a single water droplet.08.01.15Science Highlight

Freezing a Droplet to Stop the Ice

Advances in simulating water molecules in droplets reveal surfaces that may be resistant to ice formation. Read More »