Science Highlights

Structure of a gas hydrate (methane clathrate) block embedded in the sediment of hydrate ridge, off the coast of Oregon.06.20.16Science Highlight

Iron Supplements Help Microbes Working Together to Thrive When Oxygen Is Scarce

Understanding how iron minerals accelerate collaborative metabolism will expand insights into the global carbon cycle. Read More »

Painting simulating a scanning electron micrograph image of Pyrococcus furiosus.06.20.16Science Highlight

Heat-Loving Microbe Engineered to Produce Bioalcohols for Fuel

Study reports first significant alcohol production by an archaeon. Read More »

A jar of bio-oil, an alternate “crude oil” for transportation fuels currently made from petroleum, is created by first rapidly heating plant matter in a process called pyrolysis.06.20.16Science Highlight

Water Gunks Up Biofuels Production from Bio-Oils

New findings will help extend the lifetime of catalysts used to process bio-oils in liquid systems. Read More »

In the BioEnergy Science Center, researcher examines a tray of Arabidopsis.06.20.16Science Highlight

How Does Your Garden Grow? Study Identifies Instigators of Plant Growth

Identifying enzyme instigators will speed the ability to manipulate plant cell wall structures for renewable feedstocks. Read More »

A common sulfate-reducing bacterium co-evolves with another microbe to create a synergistic situation where both microbes thrive in the subsurface without oxygen, which does not penetrate below the top few centimeters of sediment.06.20.16Science Highlight

Work Together or Go It Alone? Microbes Are Split on the Answer

Microbes often evolve and work together to thrive in no oxygen situations, hinting at how carbon and energy flow just below soils and sediments. Read More »

The Columbia River receives chromium-contaminated groundwater from the Hanford Site, a former nuclear materials production and processing complex in Washington State.06.20.16Science Highlight

Stimulate Bacteria to Stop Chromium in Groundwater

Findings could aid contaminant management efforts at former weapons production and industrial processing sites. Read More »

A cage-like protein (gray) called ferritin was engineered to have metal hubs (blue) on its surface.06.09.16Science Highlight

Modular Construction - on a Molecular Scale

Predictable assembly of protein building blocks result in a new class of porous materials, with potential uses ranging from efficient fuel storage to practical carbon capture and conversion. Read More »

When light is absorbed by solar cells to make electricity, electrons and “missing electrons” are generated that move through the layers of materials in typical solar cells.06.07.16Science Highlight

New See-Through Material for Electronics

A low-cost, stable oxide film is highly conductive and transparent, rivaling its predecessors. Read More »

Selective etching of palladium (blue) from palladium-platinum core-shell nanoparticles (left) yields hollow platinum (grey) nanocages with high activity for the oxygen reduction reaction.04.30.16Science Highlight

Hollow and Filled with Potential

Hollow shape-selected platinum nanocages represent a new class of highly active catalysts. Read More »

Researchers discovered how green fluorescent proteins (center) react with water (shown around the edges of the protein).04.30.16Science Highlight

New Insight on a Familiar Glow

A new approach to investigating green fluorescent protein provides a vital tool for unraveling molecular-level details of processes important in biology and light harvesting for energy use. Read More »