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Atomic structure of the adsorbed carbon dioxide (grey sphere bonded to two red spheres) inserted between the manganese (green sphere) and amine (blue sphere) groups within the novel metal-organic framework, forming a linear chain of ammonium carbamate (top).07.01.15Science Highlight

Cooperative Carbon Capture by a Novel Material that Mimics a Plant Enzyme

Innovative materials adsorb carbon dioxide via an unprecedented cooperative insertion mechanism. Read More »

A proton (marked in yellow) is initially attached to a water molecule above the layer of carbon (grey) in graphene.07.01.15Science Highlight

The World’s Thinnest Proton Channel

Atomic-scale defects in graphene are shown to selectively allow protons to pass through a barrier that is just one carbon atom thick. Read More »

Nucleobases (shown here is thymine) encode genetic information inside DNA.06.01.15Science Highlight

Molecular Sunscreen: How DNA Protects Itself from UV Light

X-ray pulses from the Linac Coherent Light Source probe the molecular dynamics of photoexcitation. Read More »

Diamond optical cavities allow laser light (green arrow) to excite electrons on atoms held within the cavities, transferring information about the atoms outward via light (red arrow).06.01.15Science Highlight

Miniscule Mirrored Cavities Connect Quantum Memories

New structures could accelerate progress toward faster computing and high-security data transfer across fiber optic networks. Read More »

The polyborate anions wrap up the californium cations and bond to it at eight different sites.05.01.15Science Highlight

Going Back to Californium: A Changing View of Covalency

Unusual structure, bonding, and properties may provide a new possibility for a californium borate. Read More »

In this microfluidic water electrolysis device, the channels in which oxygen and hydrogen are generated by splitting water are separated by a chemically inert wall (red). The conduction of protons from one channel to the other, which is required for continuous operation, occurs via a Nafion® membrane cap (blue).05.01.15Science Highlight

Can Small Go Big? Microfluidics Aid Quest for Artificial Photosynthesis

Small-scale device provides easy “plug-and-play” testing of molecules and materials for artificial photosynthesis and fuel cell technologies. Read More »

Gallium arsenide nanowire arrays grown on a silicon substrate are studied using photoelectrochemistry.05.01.15Science Highlight

Stacking Semiconductors for Artificial Photosynthesis

Nanowire-based design incorporates two semiconductors to enhance absorption of light. Read More »

Dr. Charles McCrory is setting up a rotating disk electrode experiment, which is used to measure a material’s catalytic activity and stability under conditions that are required for a working water-splitting device.05.01.15Science Highlight

Comparing Apples to Apples: Benchmarking Electrocatalysts for Solar Water-Splitting Devices

Objective comparison of catalyst performance may enable the development of systems for artificial photosynthesis. Read More »

An interferogram showing the photoelectron energy vs. delay time between identical femtosecond pump and probe pulses, which excite coherent three-photon photoemission at a single crystal silver surface.05.01.15Science Highlight

Exciton, Exciton on the Wall

For the first time, researchers detect how light excites electrons in metal. Read More »

Perovskite nanowires have been found to function as shape-correlated stable light emitters.05.01.15Science Highlight

All-Star Nanocrystals

Tiny semiconducting crystals show promise for solar cell architectures and light-emitting devices. Read More »

Last modified: 11/9/2015 8:59:08 PM