Science Highlights

High-speed photographs of a falling water droplet on a nanostructured surface (top) before, (middle) during, and (bottom) after impact.

Super Water-Repellant Coatings Can Now Take the Pressure

Careful tuning of a surface at the nanoscale could lead to robust materials for solar panels, other uses. Read More »

Formation of large-scale 3D binary crystals with predictable lattice symmetry, as determined by the cubic geometry and DNA-encoded interactions between cubes and spheres (scale bar: 500nm)

Nanoscale Building Blocks and DNA “Glue” Help Shape 3D Architectures

New approach to design and assemble tiny composite materials could advance energy storage. Read More »

A proton (marked in yellow) is initially attached to a water molecule above the layer of carbon (grey) in graphene.

The World’s Thinnest Proton Channel

Atomic-scale defects in graphene are shown to selectively allow protons to pass through a barrier that is just one carbon atom thick. Read More »

Atomic structure of the adsorbed carbon dioxide (grey sphere bonded to two red spheres) inserted between the manganese (green sphere) and amine (blue sphere) groups within the novel metal-organic framework, forming a linear chain of ammonium carbamate (top).

Cooperative Carbon Capture by a Novel Material that Mimics a Plant Enzyme

Innovative materials adsorb carbon dioxide via an unprecedented cooperative insertion mechanism. Read More »

To help identify routes to mitigate toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and soot formation from combustion engines, scientists identified the full list of products in a key reaction between phenyl radicals and oxygen.

Up in Flames: Phenyl Oxidation Product Distribution

Researchers determine the reaction pathway to how soot and other toxic components form in combustion systems. Read More »

Snapshots of a helium bubble just before bursting when grown at slow versus fast rates.

Double, Double Toil and Trouble: Tungsten Burns and Helium Bubbles

New models reveal the impact of competing processes on helium bubble formation in plasma-exposed tungsten. Read More »

Diamond optical cavities allow laser light (green arrow) to excite electrons on atoms held within the cavities, transferring information about the atoms outward via light (red arrow).

Miniscule Mirrored Cavities Connect Quantum Memories

New structures could accelerate progress toward faster computing and high-security data transfer across fiber optic networks. Read More »

Nucleobases (shown here is thymine) encode genetic information inside DNA.

Molecular Sunscreen: How DNA Protects Itself from UV Light

X-ray pulses from the Linac Coherent Light Source probe the molecular dynamics of photoexcitation. Read More »

In this microfluidic water electrolysis device, the channels in which oxygen and hydrogen are generated by splitting water are separated by a chemically inert wall (red). The conduction of protons from one channel to the other, which is required for continuous operation, occurs via a Nafion® membrane cap (blue).

Can Small Go Big? Microfluidics Aid Quest for Artificial Photosynthesis

Small-scale device provides easy “plug-and-play” testing of molecules and materials for artificial photosynthesis and fuel cell technologies. Read More »

Dr. Charles McCrory is setting up a rotating disk electrode experiment, which is used to measure a material’s catalytic activity and stability under conditions that are required for a working water-splitting device.

Comparing Apples to Apples: Benchmarking Electrocatalysts for Solar Water-Splitting Devices

Objective comparison of catalyst performance may enable the development of systems for artificial photosynthesis. Read More »