Science Highlights

On the left: Fluorescent microscope image shows artificial bioreactors composed of sugar-based dextran polymer solution (blue) encapsulated within a shell of lipid vesicles (red). On the right: schematic illustration of what the vesicles look like at the aqueous/aqueous interface. Blue and yellow shading indicate the interior and exterior solutions.Science Highlight

New Artificial Cells Mimic Nature’s Tiny Reactors

A new approach creates microscale bioreactors for studying complex reactions for energy production and storage. Read More »

X-rays can characterize the motion of atomic-scale defects (for example, dislocations) relative to the morphology of a nanoparticle in the electrode of an operating lithium-ion battery. The dislocations are extra planes of atoms inserted into the atomic lattice.Science Highlight

Tracking Hidden Imperfections Inside Operating Lithium-ion Batteries

Penetrating x-rays can image defects and phase changes during battery charging and discharging. Read More »

Artist conception highlights electron behavior in a single layer of iron-selenium atoms (red and purple) on a strontium titanate layer (blue pyramid shapes).Science Highlight

Vibrations Raise the Critical Temperature for Superconductivity

Scientists reveal that coupling between electrons and atomic vibrations play a key role in this vexing phenomenon. Read More »

A novel catalyst transforms carbon dioxide and hydrogen into formic acid (HCOOH) via a two-step (yellow arrows) reaction.Science Highlight

Capturing and Converting CO2 in a Single Step

Researchers computationally design a cheap, efficient catalyst that captures carbon dioxide and creates a chemical building block. Read More »

Short laser pulses (the wide red arrow) on the order of femtoseconds (one quadrillionth of a second) changed the electronic properties of a material (the brown hexagonal shape) by triggering phase transitions.Science Highlight

Lasers Leave a Mark on Materials - At the Atomic Level

Ultrafast laser shots act like dopants to create new electronic properties in materials. Read More »

The benchmark catalyst Fe(CO)5 is irradiated with ultraviolet light, causing it to lose one of its five carbon monoxide groups.Science Highlight

Scientists Track Ultrafast Formation of Catalyst with X-ray Laser

First-of-its-kind measurements provide insights on reactions that could one day turn sunlight and water into fuels. Read More »

A simple chemical analogue to a biological cell responds to a perceived threats.Science Highlight

Spontaneous Pressure Regulation within Artificial Cells

Simple human-made cellular analogues both sense and regulate in response to externally created stress. Read More »

Advanced electron microscopy technique permits the simultaneous collection of both signals: secondary electron (that are sensitive to the surface) and transmitted electron.Science Highlight

Atomic-Level Measurements of Rough Surfaces

Researchers use surface-sensitive signals to atomically resolve the structure of a rough surface. Read More »

Scientists reported the first direct detection of a hydroperoxyalkyl radical—a class of reactive molecules denoted “QOOH”—that are key intermediates in combustion and atmospheric chemistry.Science Highlight

Combustion’s Mysterious “QOOH” Radicals Exposed

Direct measurement of an elusive but critical combustion molecule leads to more accurate models of ignition chemistry. Read More »

Using a scanning electron microscope, the identity of individual elements that make up a single grain of a material can be mapped from the x-rays emitted by the interactions of high energy electrons with the material.Science Highlight

New Materials Family on the Block

A family of single-phase materials was discovered with coexisting magnetic and electrical properties having potential for electronic applications. Read More »