Science Highlights

Understanding the conditions and pathways that position populations of isolated ions and shared proton species as they react in water allows scientists to better understand the chemistry of concentrated hydrogen chloride solutions, which has implications in chemical processes ranging from refining oil to building longer-lasting batteries.08.01.15Science Highlight

Keeping the Ions Close: A New Activity

Study changes perception on how acids behave in water. Read More »

Specially designed, extremely small metal structures can trap light.08.01.15Science Highlight

Light Speed Ahead!

Surface plasmons move at nearly the speed of light and travel farther than expected, possibly leading to faster electronic circuits. Read More »

When gaseous carbon dioxide (center) is dissolved in water, its water-fearing or hydrophobic nature creates a cylindrical cavity in the liquid, setting the stage for the proton transfer reactions that produce carbonic acid.08.01.15Science Highlight

The Importance of Hydration

Spectroscopy combined with theory and computation determines the interaction between carbon dioxide and water. Read More »

The matrix-free ionization platform consists of an array of silicon nanoposts.08.01.15Science Highlight

One in a Million: Analyzing Metabolites in a Single Cell

Commercialized nanopost array platform reveals metabolic changes in individual cells due to environmental stress. Read More »

A Super Uranyl-binding Protein with high affinity and selectivity could be used to mine uranium from seawater in the future.08.01.15Science Highlight

Skimming Uranium from the Sea

Using computational methods, scientists tailor and adapt proteins to mine uranium from seawater. Read More »

Fan-cooled heat sink on a microprocessor.07.01.15Science Highlight

Hundred-Fold Improvement in Temperature Mapping Reveals the Stresses Inside Tiny Transistors

New nanoscale thermal imaging technique shows heat building up inside microprocessors, providing new information to help solve heat-related performance issues. Read More »

The top figure shows the energy/time distribution of the twin bunches measured with an X-band transverse deflector.07.01.15Science Highlight

Two-color X-rays Give Scientists 3-D View of the Unknown

Pairs of precisely tuned X-ray pulses uncover ultrafast processes and previously unmapped structures. Read More »

High-speed photographs of a falling water droplet on a nanostructured surface (top) before, (middle) during, and (bottom) after impact.07.01.15Science Highlight

Super Water-Repellant Coatings Can Now Take the Pressure

Careful tuning of a surface at the nanoscale could lead to robust materials for solar panels, other uses. Read More »

Formation of large-scale 3D binary crystals with predictable lattice symmetry, as determined by the cubic geometry and DNA-encoded interactions between cubes and spheres (scale bar: 500nm)07.01.15Science Highlight

Nanoscale Building Blocks and DNA “Glue” Help Shape 3D Architectures

New approach to design and assemble tiny composite materials could advance energy storage. Read More »

A proton (marked in yellow) is initially attached to a water molecule above the layer of carbon (grey) in graphene.07.01.15Science Highlight

The World’s Thinnest Proton Channel

Atomic-scale defects in graphene are shown to selectively allow protons to pass through a barrier that is just one carbon atom thick. Read More »