Science Highlights

Scientists devised a new way to wire a photosynthetic protein onto an electrode for integration into devices that turn sunlight into fuel. The light energy collected by the proteins (green) extracts electrons from an electrode (orangey red) through long molecules (yellow) under the proteins.12.14.15Science Highlight

How to Wire Photosynthetic Proteins to Electrodes

New approach for connecting light-harvesting proteins enhances the current produced by a factor of four. Read More »

Defects (red and blue markings) surprisingly self-organize in active liquid crystal film of protein filaments and such dynamic reorganization could lead to new approaches for designing self-healing materials.12.14.15Science Highlight

Defects Lead to Order

Surprising order found in bundles of protein filaments that move chaotically and form liquid crystals that could led to novel self-healing. Read More »

Whether a solid or liquid forms from charged polymers depends on the “handedness” of the oppositely charged polymer chains.12.14.15Science Highlight

Will It Be a Solid or a Liquid? The Molecular Structure Has the Answer

Oppositely charged polymer chains can be “right-handed,” “left-handed,” or have no “handedness” at all, which controls whether a solid or liquid forms. Read More »

Aluminum-ion batteries could rapidly charge - in less than one minute.12.14.15Science Highlight

A Step Towards New, Faster-Charging, and Safer Batteries

First prototypes of aluminum-ion batteries charge quickly and have the potential for long lifetimes, low cost, and safe operation. Read More »

The width of a graphene nanoribbon determines its electronic properties, but controlling that width at the atomic scale is a challenge.12.14.15Science Highlight

Legos for the Fabrication of Atomically Precise Electronic Circuits

Pre-designed molecular building blocks provide atomic-level control of the width of graphene nanoribbons. Read More »

A scanning probe microscope (SPM) can detect two similar signals, which could lead to ambiguous identification of ferroelectric materials.12.14.15Science Highlight

Ferroelectricity – Ambiguity Clarified, and Resolved

Novel technique accurately distinguishes rare material property linked to improving sensors and computers. Read More »

Secretion in droplet-embedded gel permits self-repairing behavior.12.14.15Science Highlight

Damaged Material, Heal Thyself

Internal storage compartments release droplets of “healing” liquid to repair damaged materials. Read More »

Researchers from the Molecular Foundry, working with users from Columbia University led by Latha Venkataraman, have created the world’s highest-performance single-molecule diode using a combination of gold electrodes and an ionic solution.11.01.15Science Highlight

Viable Single-Molecule Diodes

Major milestone in molecular electronics scored by Molecular Foundry and Columbia University team. Read More »

Working with Molecular Foundry staff, an international team of users utilized the TEAM 1 microscope to plot the exact coordinates of nine layers of atoms with a precision of 19 trillionths of a meter.11.01.15Science Highlight

Unprecedented Precise Determination of Three-Dimensional Atomic Positions

For the first time, electron tomography reveals the 3D coordinates of individual atoms and defects in a material. Read More »

(Left) Silicon wires with match heads and (right) light absorption profile of a single match-head wire at 587 nm absorption.11.01.15Science Highlight

Match-Heads Boost Photovoltaic Efficiency

Tiny “match-head” wires act as built-in light concentrators, enhancing solar cell efficiency. Read More »