Joint Bioenergy Institute

Joint Bioenergy Institute 

 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Stories of Discovery & Innovation

This image is a network graph—called a “minimum spanning tree”—showing the 7,410 DFT-predicted stable compounds from the Open Quantum Materials Database (OQMD) at the time the JOM article was completed.07.09.14Stories of Discovery & Innovation

From Human Genome to Materials “Genome”

Government initiative seeks to speed the pace of materials discovery and innovation. Read More »

Troy Van Voorhis, professor of chemistry (left), and Marc Baldo, professor of electrical engineering (right).05.27.14Stories of Discovery & Innovation

Getting More Electricity out of Solar Cells

New MIT model can guide design of solar cells that produce less waste heat, more useful current. Read More »

Photo shows wild type Arabidopsis, a plant with just the two Mediator mutations, a dwarf mutant with reduced lignin production, and a mutant with all three mutations, restored to wild-type size.04.30.14Stories of Discovery & Innovation

Squaring the Circle in Biofuels?

Researchers produce a new type of plant fiber that supports normal growth while easing the difficulties of conversion to fuel. Read More »

Researchers use a near-infrared microscope to read the output of carbon nanotube sensors embedded in an Arabidopsis thaliana plant.03.31.14Stories of Discovery & Innovation

Bionic Plants

Nanotechnology could turn shrubbery into supercharged energy producers. Read More »

A nanophotonic solar thermophotovoltaic device composed of an array of multi‑walled carbon nanotubes as the absorber, a one‑dimensional silicon/silicon dioxide photonic crystal as the emitter, and a 0.55 eV photovoltaic cell.01.27.14Stories of Discovery & Innovation

Harvesting the Sun’s Energy Through Heat as Well as Light

New approach developed at MIT could generate power from sunlight efficiently and on demand. Read More »

Science Highlights

In this microfluidic water electrolysis device, the channels in which oxygen and hydrogen are generated by splitting water are separated by a chemically inert wall (red). The conduction of protons from one channel to the other, which is required for continuous operation, occurs via a Nafion® membrane cap (blue).May 2015Science Highlights

Can Small Go Big? Microfluidics Aid Quest for Artificial Photosynthesis

Small-scale device provides easy “plug-and-play” testing of molecules and materials for artificial photosynthesis and fuel cell technologies. Read More »

Dr. Charles McCrory is setting up a rotating disk electrode experiment, which is used to measure a material’s catalytic activity and stability under conditions that are required for a working water-splitting device.May 2015Science Highlights

Comparing Apples to Apples: Benchmarking Electrocatalysts for Solar Water-Splitting Devices

Objective comparison of catalyst performance may enable the development of systems for artificial photosynthesis. Read More »

Gallium arsenide nanowire arrays grown on a silicon substrate are studied using photoelectrochemistry.May 2015Science Highlights

Stacking Semiconductors for Artificial Photosynthesis

Nanowire-based design incorporates two semiconductors to enhance absorption of light. Read More »

Schematic view of the chlorine (Cl) addition - hydrochloric acid (HCl) elimination reaction with isobutene.May 2015Science Highlights

Roaming Dynamics in Bimolecular Reactions

Study reveals peculiar mechanism of radical addition-elimination, enabling more accurate modeling of combustion and other reactions. Read More »

Hot nanowires emit lattice vibrations known as phonons into underlying materials. When closely packed, phonon collisions can more efficiently transport heat away.May 2015Science Highlights

Staying Close and Keeping Cool

Hot nanostructures cool faster when they are physically close together. Read More »