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The ring pattern from the new transmission X-ray diffraction analysis is from the polycrystalline nature of the alloy - in other words, it indicates that the atoms are arranged in small crystalline regions (called grains) that have many different orientations.06.07.16Science Highlight

Finding a Needle in a Crystalline Haystack

New X-ray technique reveals the presence of one-in-a-million large crystalline regions from metals fatiguing—stabilization schemes could lead to impervious metals. Read More »

When light is absorbed by solar cells to make electricity, electrons and “missing electrons” are generated that move through the layers of materials in typical solar cells.06.07.16Science Highlight

New See-Through Material for Electronics

A low-cost, stable oxide film is highly conductive and transparent, rivaling its predecessors. Read More »

The discovery that electrically conductive, hair-like filaments on the surface of Geobacter bacteria could mark a new paradigm for the employment of biological materials in nanoscale electron devices.06.06.16Science Highlight

Bacteria Hairs Make Excellent Electrical Wires

This discovery could lead to low-cost, non-toxic, biological components for light-weight electronics. Read More »

Snakes on a plane: This atomic-resolution simulation of a peptoid nanosheet reveals a snake-like structure never seen before. The nanosheet’s layers include a water-repelling core (yellow), peptoid backbones (white), and charged sidechains (magenta and cyan). The right corner of the nanosheet’s top layer has been “removed” to show how the backbone’s alternating rotational states give the backbones a snake-like appearance (red and blue ribbons). Surrounding water molecules are red and white.06.06.16Science Highlight

Understanding and Predicting Self-Assembly

Newly discovered “design rule” brings nature-inspired nanostructures one step closer. Read More »

View of the surface of a lithium pool in Lithium Tokamak Experiment, as it is heated and cleaned of oxides by a beam of high energy electrons.05.20.16Science Highlight

Hotter All The Way: Lithium Wall Contains Plasma Without Cooling It

Lithium walls open up access to new regimes for the fusion reactor. Read More »

Selective etching of palladium (blue) from palladium-platinum core-shell nanoparticles (left) yields hollow platinum (grey) nanocages with high activity for the oxygen reduction reaction.04.30.16Science Highlight

Hollow and Filled with Potential

Hollow shape-selected platinum nanocages represent a new class of highly active catalysts. Read More »

This results demonstrate a temporal resolution sufficient to directly image chemical reactions.04.30.16Science Highlight

Capturing Molecular Motion with Relativistic Electrons

The world’s fastest images of nitrogen molecules rotating in a gas were captured using electron diffraction. Read More »

Researchers discovered how green fluorescent proteins (center) react with water (shown around the edges of the protein).04.30.16Science Highlight

New Insight on a Familiar Glow

A new approach to investigating green fluorescent protein provides a vital tool for unraveling molecular-level details of processes important in biology and light harvesting for energy use. Read More »

The deposition of a silicon dioxide layer (yellow layer) on a carbon nanotube (gray spheres) introduces solitary oxygen dopants (red spheres).03.31.16Science Highlight

Using Nanotubes to Create Single Photons for Quantum Communication

Demonstration of room temperature, single photon emission in doped carbon nanotubes opens a new path toward quantum information technologies. Read More »

Adding a water molecule to the positively charged protactinium dioxide ion results in hydrolysis, or water splitting.03.31.16Science Highlight

Rare Meets Common: Reacting Protactinium with Ubiquitous Water Explains an Elemental Oddity

Reactions with this extremely rare element could reveal previously unknown trends, benefiting studies of new nuclear reactor fuels. Read More »