Laboratory Science Highlights

Search / Filter Highlights

Filters / Search applied:   DOE Laboratory [x]
Note: Selecting items from multiple filter menus will show fewer results. Selecting multiple items within the same filter menu will show more results.
Filter by Performer
Or press Esc Key to close.
close
Select all that apply.
Close
Simulation of stretching of a silver nanowire accurately shows the entire process from “necking” (thinner regions in the wire) to the formation of a new phase (red portion in the last image).12.14.15Science Highlight

When Small Things Become a Big Deal

Computer-simulated atomic motion answers real-world questions like “How do things break?” Read More »

Short laser pulses (the wide red arrow) on the order of femtoseconds (one quadrillionth of a second) changed the electronic properties of a material (the brown hexagonal shape) by triggering phase transitions.12.14.15Science Highlight

Lasers Leave a Mark on Materials - At the Atomic Level

Ultrafast laser shots act like dopants to create new electronic properties in materials. Read More »

A scanning probe microscope (SPM) can detect two similar signals, which could lead to ambiguous identification of ferroelectric materials.12.14.15Science Highlight

Ferroelectricity – Ambiguity Clarified, and Resolved

Novel technique accurately distinguishes rare material property linked to improving sensors and computers. Read More »

Advanced electron microscopy technique permits the simultaneous collection of both signals: secondary electron (that are sensitive to the surface) and transmitted electron.12.14.15Science Highlight

Atomic-Level Measurements of Rough Surfaces

Researchers use surface-sensitive signals to atomically resolve the structure of a rough surface. Read More »

The width of a graphene nanoribbon determines its electronic properties, but controlling that width at the atomic scale is a challenge.12.14.15Science Highlight

Legos for the Fabrication of Atomically Precise Electronic Circuits

Pre-designed molecular building blocks provide atomic-level control of the width of graphene nanoribbons. Read More »

Whether a solid or liquid forms from charged polymers depends on the “handedness” of the oppositely charged polymer chains.12.14.15Science Highlight

Will It Be a Solid or a Liquid? The Molecular Structure Has the Answer

Oppositely charged polymer chains can be “right-handed,” “left-handed,” or have no “handedness” at all, which controls whether a solid or liquid forms. Read More »

11.01.15Science Highlight

One Photon or Two?

First mixed matter/anti-matter probe aims to solve decade-old proton puzzle. Read More »

A stripe-shaped magnetic region (domain), shown in blue (top left) in an ultrathin film device (orange structure). The narrowing region of the device causes the current distribution to change (two of the three red arrows change direction), leading to the breakdown of the magnetic domain into circular disk-shaped bubbles, called skyrmions (bottom left) Magnetic skyrmion bubbles (bottom right) were experimentally observed using magnetic imaging.11.01.15Science Highlight

Creating Novel Magnetic Islands for Spintronics

Generating and moving small, stable magnetic islands at room temperature could be the ticket to more energy-efficient electronics. Read More »

Schematic drawing shows an electron (gold sphere) moving in the direction of the green arrow on the surface of a topological crystalline insulator. In this material, the electron’s quantum-mechanical spin (up) (blue arrow) is coupled with the direction of its motion in such a way that reversing its direction of motion would reverse the direction of the spin (down).11.01.15Science Highlight

You Can Have Your Conductor and Insulator, Too

Scientists synthesized a theoretically-predicted material with unusual current-carrying properties that could open the door for next-generation electronics. Read More »

(Left) Silicon wires with match heads and (right) light absorption profile of a single match-head wire at 587 nm absorption.11.01.15Science Highlight

Match-Heads Boost Photovoltaic Efficiency

Tiny “match-head” wires act as built-in light concentrators, enhancing solar cell efficiency. Read More »