News Archives

Washington State University 06.07.16University Research

Study Clears Way for New Approaches to Plant DiseaseExternal link

A Washington State University biologist has found what he calls “very strong support” for an 86-year-old hypothesis about how nutrients move through plants. His two-decade analysis of the phenomenon has resulted in a suite of techniques that can ultimately be used to fight plant diseases and make crops more efficient. Read More »

Louisiana State University 06.06.16University Research

LSU Physicists Discover Extreme Light from Frozen ArgonExternal link

A team of researchers at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University in collaboration with colleagues at Louisiana State University have directly compared the ultrafast, extreme ultraviolet radiation emitted by argon atoms when they are in their gas phase or in their weakly bound solid phase and found significant differences between them. Read More »

A depiction of the experimental apparatus used to distinguish the pear shape (upper left) present in some barium nuclei from the more common spherical (upper right) or ellipsoidal (lower left) shapes characteristic of most nuclei.06.06.16Science Highlight

Confirmed: Heavy Barium Nuclei Prefer a Pear Shape

Cutting-edge experiment with a beam of radioactive barium ions provides direct evidence of nuclear pear-shape deformation. Read More »

The discovery that electrically conductive, hair-like filaments on the surface of Geobacter bacteria could mark a new paradigm for the employment of biological materials in nanoscale electron devices.06.06.16Science Highlight

Bacteria Hairs Make Excellent Electrical Wires

This discovery could lead to low-cost, non-toxic, biological components for light-weight electronics. Read More »

A vector map of the measured deflections of an atomic-sized electron beam scanned across different polar domains in the ferroelectric bismuth ferrite. The image was recorded in about a minute by the new electron microscope pixel array detector.06.06.16Science Highlight

New High-Capability Solid-State Electron Microscope Detector Enables Novel Studies of Materials

Device allows fast, precise measurements of electric and magnetic fields at the atomic level, providing insights into the next generation of electronic, energy production, and storage materials. Read More »

In the 1980s, scientists discovered that a proton's three valance quarks (red, green, blue) account for only a fraction of the proton's overall spin. New measurements from RHIC's PHENIX experiment reveal that gluons (yellow corkscrews) contribute as much as or possibly more than the quarks.06.06.16Science Highlight

Zooming in on Gluons' Contribution to Proton Spin

New data that "wimpy" gluons, the glue-like particles that bind quarks within protons, have a big impact on proton spin. Read More »

Snakes on a plane: This atomic-resolution simulation of a peptoid nanosheet reveals a snake-like structure never seen before. The nanosheet’s layers include a water-repelling core (yellow), peptoid backbones (white), and charged sidechains (magenta and cyan). The right corner of the nanosheet’s top layer has been “removed” to show how the backbone’s alternating rotational states give the backbones a snake-like appearance (red and blue ribbons). Surrounding water molecules are red and white.06.06.16Science Highlight

Understanding and Predicting Self-Assembly

Newly discovered “design rule” brings nature-inspired nanostructures one step closer. Read More »

06.03.16User Facility

How to Heal Broken Bonds, Catalyst StyleExternal link

Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory demonstrated how defects deep inside a zeolite catalyst could be healed, allowing the catalyst to drive reactions in hot water, a common environment for materials involved in converting paper industry waste and other biomass into fuels. Read More »

06.03.16User Facility

Scientists Find Surprising Magnetic Excitations in a Metallic CompoundExternal link

An experimental team of researchers originally from Brookhaven Lab and Stony Brook University and from the University of Amsterdam have developed a model to describe the behavior of the metallic compound made of ytterbium, platinum, and lead (Yb2Pt2Pb), leading to a new understanding of how spinions contribute to – but orbital motion is the dominant mechanism for – magnetism. Read More »

Grand Valley State University 06.03.16University Research

Superbug Scare: GVSU Faculty Searching for SolutionsExternal link

Several chemistry professors, including Rachel Powers, Brad Wallar, and David Leonard, and their teams of undergraduate students at Grand Valley State University have spent the past 10 years researching solutions to antibiotic resistance, using the high-energy X-ray beams at Argonne National Lab to create three-dimensional images of enzymes that inhibit antibiotics. Read More »

Last modified: 11/20/2013 6:03:07 AM