News Archives

Carnegie Institution for Science 06.08.16University Research

Rust Under Pressure Could Explain Deep Earth AnomaliesExternal link

Using laboratory techniques to mimic the conditions found deep inside the Earth, a team of Carnegie scientists led by Ho-Kwang “Dave” Mao has identified a form of iron oxide that they believe could explain seismic and geothermal signatures in the deep mantle. Read More »

06.08.16From the Labs

Provisional Names Announced for Superheavy Elements 113, 115, 117, and 118External link

The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) Inorganic Chemistry Division has published a Provisional Recommendation for the names and symbols of the recently discovered superheavy elements 113, 115, 117, and 118. Read More »

The cross-section shows key features of a new solar cell architecture.06.08.16Science Highlight

Keep it Simple: Low-Cost Solar Power

A simplified architecture leads to efficiencies rivaling conventional silicon solar cells. Read More »

Electrons have distinct energy levels where the energy is minimized, similar to a ball rolling down a mountain to a valley.06.08.16Science Highlight

Laser Manipulates Electronic Properties

Dressing electrons with a rotating field of laser light creates distinct, controllable states, opening the door for innovative electronics. Read More »

Nanometer-sized junctions between two types of two-dimensional semiconductors could replace conventional wider three-dimensional junctions.06.08.16Science Highlight

Patterning Smaller Junctions for Ultrathin Devices

Patterned arrays of nanometer-sized connections in two-dimensional semiconductors could enable ultrathin integrated circuits for smartphones and solar cells. Read More »

06.07.16Profile

NSLS-II User Profiles: Wilson ChiuExternal link

Wilson K. S. Chiu, a professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at the University of Connecticut, recently conducted an experiment as one of the first general users at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) Hard X-Ray Nanoprobe (HXN). Read More »

The crystallized oxide (lighter regions) spelling the word “small” was “printed” on a non-crystallized layer (darker gray) by a well-controlled beam in an electron microscope.06.07.16Science Highlight

Atomic Sculpting with a Microscope

A new tool allows atomic 3D printing. Read More »

Two-dimensional snapshot used to reconstruct the 3D image of a particle.06.07.16Science Highlight

Saturday Night at the Movies: 3D Sneak Preview of Dancing Platinum Particles at Atomic Resolution

Three-dimensional structure of nanocrystals in solution determined with atomic resolution using a new technique. Read More »

Progressively magnified images of graphene nanoribbons grown on germanium semiconductor wafers.06.07.16Science Highlight

Growing Graphene Ribbons in One Direction

New method to fabricate graphene nanoribbon arrays on semiconductor wafers turns semimetal into semiconductor. Read More »

Confined in droplets, exotic phases of liquid crystals have been simulated (left) and experimentally observed (right).06.07.16Science Highlight

Tiny Droplets… Lead to Exotic Properties

Chameleon-like color changes are observed by confining liquid crystals within small drops. Read More »

Last modified: 11/20/2013 6:03:07 AM