News Archives

A simple chemical analogue to a biological cell responds to a perceived threats.11.01.15Science Highlight

Spontaneous Pressure Regulation within Artificial Cells

Simple human-made cellular analogues both sense and regulate in response to externally created stress. Read More »

11.01.15Science Highlight

One Photon or Two?

First mixed matter/anti-matter probe aims to solve decade-old proton puzzle. Read More »

A stripe-shaped magnetic region (domain), shown in blue (top left) in an ultrathin film device (orange structure). The narrowing region of the device causes the current distribution to change (two of the three red arrows change direction), leading to the breakdown of the magnetic domain into circular disk-shaped bubbles, called skyrmions (bottom left) Magnetic skyrmion bubbles (bottom right) were experimentally observed using magnetic imaging.11.01.15Science Highlight

Creating Novel Magnetic Islands for Spintronics

Generating and moving small, stable magnetic islands at room temperature could be the ticket to more energy-efficient electronics. Read More »

The ion accelerator at the Laboratory for Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics produces the highest intensity proton beam current in the world for measuring nuclear fusion reactions that take place in stars.11.01.15Science Highlight

Probing Nuclear Reactions in Stars

Novel experiments measure unusual thermonuclear fusion of hydrogen with a rare oxygen isotope. Read More »

Schematic drawing shows an electron (gold sphere) moving in the direction of the green arrow on the surface of a topological crystalline insulator. In this material, the electron’s quantum-mechanical spin (up) (blue arrow) is coupled with the direction of its motion in such a way that reversing its direction of motion would reverse the direction of the spin (down).11.01.15Science Highlight

You Can Have Your Conductor and Insulator, Too

Scientists synthesized a theoretically-predicted material with unusual current-carrying properties that could open the door for next-generation electronics. Read More »

(Left) Silicon wires with match heads and (right) light absorption profile of a single match-head wire at 587 nm absorption.11.01.15Science Highlight

Match-Heads Boost Photovoltaic Efficiency

Tiny “match-head” wires act as built-in light concentrators, enhancing solar cell efficiency. Read More »

Researchers from the Molecular Foundry, working with users from Columbia University led by Latha Venkataraman, have created the world’s highest-performance single-molecule diode using a combination of gold electrodes and an ionic solution.11.01.15Science Highlight

Viable Single-Molecule Diodes

Major milestone in molecular electronics scored by Molecular Foundry and Columbia University team. Read More »

Off-center collisions of gold ions create a strong magnetic field and set up a series of effects that push positively charged particles to the poles of the football-shaped collision zone and negatively charged particles to the 11.01.15Science Highlight

Ripples Ruffle Primordial Plasma

RHIC physicists discover key evidence for a long-debated phenomenon in particle collisions. Read More »

A 83mKr conversion electron as seen by Project 8.11.01.15Science Highlight

Project 8 Detects Individual Electrons by their Cyclotron Radiation

New electron spectroscopy technique may lead to an improved neutrino mass determination. Read More »

Inside the Super-Kamiokande detector, scientists clean light-detecting photomultiplier tubes from a raft as the large underground tank is slowly filled with 50,000 metric tons of ultra-pure water.11.01.15Science Highlight

A Nobel for Neutrinos: Super-Kamiokande

Discovery of neutrino oscillations, which shows that neutrinos have mass, garners the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics. Read More »

Last modified: 11/20/2013 6:03:07 AM