News Archives

This illustration shows arrestin (yellow), an important type of signaling protein, while docked with rhodopsin (orange), a G protein-coupled receptor. 07.22.15FROM THE LABS

Long-Sought Discovery Fills in Missing Details of Cell 'Switchboard'External link

SLAC's x-ray laser lends new insight into key target for drug development. Read More »

07.22.15USER FACILITY

Simulations Lead to Design of Near-Frictionless MaterialExternal link

Argonne scientists used Mira to identify and improve a new mechanism for eliminating friction, which fed into the development of a hybrid material that exhibited superlubricity at the macroscale for the first time. Read More »

07.22.15USER FACILITY

Cleaning Up Bunker Oil with White Rot FungiExternal link

Researchers at the DOE Joint Genome Institute evaluate how fungi better known for breaking down plant biomass do in a bioremediation application. Read More »

Florida State University 07.22.15University Research

New Molecular Butterflies Help Advance Energy ResearchExternal link

Scientists at Florida State University have designed and produced new molecules resembling butterflies that have a wide range of potential applications, from molecular sensors to light-controlling devices. Read More »

University of North Carolina 07.21.15University Research

Plant Defense Hormones Help Sculpt Root MicrobiomeExternal link

According to new research from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the defense hormone salicylic acid helps select which bacteria live both inside and on the surface of a plant’s roots, keeping some families out and actively recruiting others. Read More »

07.21.15USER FACILITY

New Technique to Synthesize Nanostructured NanowiresExternal link

A new approach to self-assemble and tailor complex structures at the nanoscale, developed by an international collaboration led by the University of Cambridge and IBM, using the facilities at Brookhaven Lab’s Center for Functional Nanomaterials, opens opportunities to tailor properties and functionalities of materials for a wide range of semiconductor device applications. Read More »

07.20.15FROM THE LABS

Scientists Hijack Light-Loving Bacteria to Make High-Value ProductsExternal link

Scientists at PNNL and the Colorado School of Mines have directed a common bacterium to produce more of a valuable fatty acid, lauric acid, than it typically does. Read More »

07.20.15FROM THE LABS

Perovskite Solar Technology Shows Quick Energy ReturnsExternal link

A joint study by Argonne National Laboratory and Northwestern University found that perovskite-based solar technology has the quickest energy payback time of all current solar technologies. Read More »

The Southern Ocean's clouds can cool the Earth by reflecting sunlight that would otherwise be absorbed by the darker ocean below. 07.20.15FROM THE LABS

How Clouds Get Their BrightnessExternal link

Scientists at Pacific Northwest and Los Alamos national laboratories, along with colleagues at the University of Leeds and the University of Washington, show that marine life cultivates half of the summer cloud droplets over the Southern Ocean. Read More »

University California San Diego 07.20.15University Research

Trapped Light Orbits Within an Intriguing MaterialExternal link

Light becomes trapped as it orbits within tiny granules of a crystalline material that has increasingly intrigued physicists, a team led by University of California, San Diego, physics professor Michael Fogler has found. Read More »

Last modified: 11/20/2013 6:03:07 AM