Featured Articles

2014

Advanced Light Source images of a Cu2SeO3 sample show five sets of dual-peak skyrmion structures, highlighted by the white ovals. 06.25.14FROM THE LABS

Advanced Light Source Provides New Look at SkyrmionsExternal link

Skyrmions, subatomic quasiparticles that could play a key role in future spintronic technologies, have been observed for the first time using x-rays at Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source. Read More »

Thymine – the molecule in the foreground – is one of the four basic building blocks that make up the double helix of DNA. 06.23.14FROM THE LABS

Scientists Use X-rays to Look at How DNA Protects Itself from UV LightExternal link

SLAC research reveals rapid DNA changes that act as molecular sunscreen. Read More »

An X-ray laser pulse at SLAC’s Linac Coherent Light Source probes a supercooled water droplet (center, left). 06.19.14FROM THE LABS

Scientists Take First Dip into Water’s Mysterious ‘No Man’s Land’External link

Observations of the strange state of liquid water in frozen conditions made by scientists at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory will improve our understanding of the ubiquitous but unusual H2O. Read More »

We live atop the thinnest layer of the Earth: the crust. Below is the mantle (red), outer core (orange), and finally inner core (yellow-white). 06.18.14FROM THE LABS

Composition of Earth’s Mantle RevisitedExternal link

Research at Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source recently suggested that the makeup of the Earth’s mantle is significantly different from what was previously thought. Read More »

Brookhaven physicist Oleg Gang and Stony Brook University postdoctoral researcher Sunita Srivastava. 06.11.14FROM THE LABS

DNA-Linked Nanoparticles Form Switchable "Thin Films" on a Liquid SurfaceExternal link

Possible pathway to adjustable filters, surfaces with variable mechanical response, or even new ways to deliver genes for biomedical applications. Read More »

Official groundbreakers for Ames Laboratory's new Sensitive Instrument Facility. 06.09.14FROM THE LABS

Ames Laboratory Breaks Ground on Sensitive Instrument FacilityExternal link

13,300 square-foot facility will house state-of-the-art instruments which advance the Lab’s role in materials characterization and support the Department of Energy’s science mission. Read More »

A computer simulation of gas (in yellow) falling into a black hole (too small to be seen). Twin jets are also shown with magnetic field lines. 06.05.14FROM THE LABS

Surprisingly Strong Magnetic Fields Challenge Black Holes’ PullExternal link

Analysis of radio waves from black holes shows long-neglected magnetic fields have an unexpected presence. Read More »

A metal oxide drop levitated in a flow of gas is being heated from above with a laser beam so that researchers can study the behavior of this class of ceramics under high temperatures. 06.03.14FROM THE LABS

Neutrons and X-rays Reveal Structure of High-temperature Liquid Metal OxidesExternal link

Research on ceramics by scientists at Oak Ridge and Argonne national laboratories could lead to insights in everything from the formation of glasses to the evolution of planets. Read More »

Materials scientist Huolin Xin in Brookhaven Lab's Center for Functional Nanomaterials. 05.30.14FROM THE LABS

Scientists Pinpoint the Creeping Nanocrystals Behind Lithium-Ion Battery DegradationExternal link

Two breakthrough studies track the nanoscale structural changes that degrade battery performance during cycles of charge and discharge. Read More »

Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory's Center for Nanoscale Materials created the transistors, which are the world's thinnest flexible 2-D transparent thin-film transistors. 05.29.14FROM THE LABS

Flexible, Transparent Thin Film Transistors Raise Hopes for Flexible ScreensExternal link

Argonne National Laboratory has reported the creation of the world’s thinnest flexible, see-through 2-D thin film transistors. Read More »

Last modified: 12/9/2014 3:23:02 PM