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Confined in droplets, exotic phases of liquid crystals have been simulated (left) and experimentally observed (right).06.07.16Science Highlight

Tiny Droplets… Lead to Exotic Properties

Chameleon-like color changes are observed by confining liquid crystals within small drops. Read More »

When light is absorbed by solar cells to make electricity, electrons and “missing electrons” are generated that move through the layers of materials in typical solar cells.06.07.16Science Highlight

New See-Through Material for Electronics

A low-cost, stable oxide film is highly conductive and transparent, rivaling its predecessors. Read More »

Perovskite-based nanowire lasers are the most efficient known.06.07.16Science Highlight

World’s Most Efficient Nanowire Lasers

Materials with extraordinary performance in solar cells are discovered to be efficient, tunable lasers at room temperature. Read More »

The discovery that electrically conductive, hair-like filaments on the surface of Geobacter bacteria could mark a new paradigm for the employment of biological materials in nanoscale electron devices.06.06.16Science Highlight

Bacteria Hairs Make Excellent Electrical Wires

This discovery could lead to low-cost, non-toxic, biological components for light-weight electronics. Read More »

A vector map of the measured deflections of an atomic-sized electron beam scanned across different polar domains in the ferroelectric bismuth ferrite. The image was recorded in about a minute by the new electron microscope pixel array detector.06.06.16Science Highlight

New High-Capability Solid-State Electron Microscope Detector Enables Novel Studies of Materials

Device allows fast, precise measurements of electric and magnetic fields at the atomic level, providing insights into the next generation of electronic, energy production, and storage materials. Read More »

Snakes on a plane: This atomic-resolution simulation of a peptoid nanosheet reveals a snake-like structure never seen before. The nanosheet’s layers include a water-repelling core (yellow), peptoid backbones (white), and charged sidechains (magenta and cyan). The right corner of the nanosheet’s top layer has been “removed” to show how the backbone’s alternating rotational states give the backbones a snake-like appearance (red and blue ribbons). Surrounding water molecules are red and white.06.06.16Science Highlight

Understanding and Predicting Self-Assembly

Newly discovered “design rule” brings nature-inspired nanostructures one step closer. Read More »

A high-resolution photo shows the inside of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak with a representative cross-section of a fusion plasma superimposed.05.20.16Science Highlight

Supercomputers Predict New Turbulent Interactions in Fusion Plasmas

Cutting-edge simulations provide an explanation for a mystery over half a century old. Read More »

A new algorithm reduces timing uncertainty by a factor of 300, revealing ultrafast dynamics on timescales as short as a quadrillionth of a second.05.02.16Science Highlight

Creating a Better Way to Find Out “When”

Computer algorithm recovers histories and dynamics on timescales much faster than uncertainties inherent in experimental data. Read More »

Selective etching of palladium (blue) from palladium-platinum core-shell nanoparticles (left) yields hollow platinum (grey) nanocages with high activity for the oxygen reduction reaction.04.30.16Science Highlight

Hollow and Filled with Potential

Hollow shape-selected platinum nanocages represent a new class of highly active catalysts. Read More »

This results demonstrate a temporal resolution sufficient to directly image chemical reactions.04.30.16Science Highlight

Capturing Molecular Motion with Relativistic Electrons

The world’s fastest images of nitrogen molecules rotating in a gas were captured using electron diffraction. Read More »