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The undulator hall of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). 

 SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

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Silicon nanowires growth explored at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS). 

 Oak Ridge National Laboratory

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The Titan Cray XK7 supercomputer at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF). 

 Oak Ridge National Laboratory

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Fluidic robots for Combinatorial Nanoscience materials synthesis at the Molecular Foundry (TMF). 

 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

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A Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) image of amorphous silicon balls at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). 

 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

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Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) station at Barrow, Alaska. 

 ARM Climate Research Facility

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The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linear accelerator. 

 Oak Ridge National Laboratory

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A research collaborator, working inside the NSTX vacuum vessel prior to its upgrade. 

 Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

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Interior of the DIII-D tokamak. 

 General Atomics

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The Hard X-ray Nanoprobe at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). 

 Argonne National Laboratory

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The accelerator at Brookhaven National Laboratory’s Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). 

 Brookhaven National Laboratory

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A blue glow from Cherenkov radiation in the reactor pool of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from stored fuel elements. 

 Oak Ridge National Laboratory

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The Matter in Extreme Conditions instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). 

 SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

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Atom probe sample chamber at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). 

 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

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Genetic sequencers at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI). 

 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

The Office of Science national scientific user facilities provide researchers with the most advanced tools of modern science including accelerators, colliders, supercomputers, light sources and neutron sources, as well as facilities for studying the nanoworld, the environment, and the atmosphere. In Fiscal Year 2014 over 33,000 researchers from academia, industry, and government laboratories, spanning all fifty states and the District of Columbia, utilized these unique facilities to perform new scientific research.

A user facility is a federally sponsored research facility available for external use to advance scientific or technical knowledge under the following conditions:

  • The facility is open to all interested potential users without regard to nationality or institutional affiliation.
  • Allocation of facility resources is determined by merit review of the proposed work.
  • User fees are not charged for non-proprietary work if the user intends to publish the research results in the open literature. Full cost recovery is required for proprietary work.
  • The facility provides resources sufficient for users to conduct work safely and efficiently.
  • The facility supports a formal user organization to represent the users and facilitate sharing of information, forming collaborations, and organizing research efforts among users.
  • The facility capability does not compete with an available private sector capability.
User Facilities at a Glance »
Browse and search information about SC user facilities.
User Resources »
Information for users, including Getting Started links and model User Agreements.
User Statistics »
Explore statistical information regarding prior year projects.
Policies and Processes »
Official policy memoranda and other documents related to policies and processes.
Science Highlights »
Summaries of recent research at the user facilities.
FAQs »
Answers to common questions regarding the SC user facility enterprise.