06.01.18

Renewable Solvents Derived From Lignin Lower Waste in Biofuel Production

New class of solvents breaks down plant biomass into sugars for biofuels and bioproducts in a closed-loop biorefinery concept.

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Renewable Solvents Derived From Lignin Lowers Waste in Biofuel Production

Biorefinery concept using renewable deep eutectic solvents (DESs) derived from lignin feedstocks is shown here.

The Science

A closed-loop biorefinery could dramatically lower the cost of biofuels and related products. In this approach, the refinery produces the solvents it needs, rather than “importing” them. Scientists at the Joint BioEnergy Institute are developing a closed-loop biorefinery concept that uses waste lignin as a potential process solvent. How? They synthesized a new and renewable class of deep eutectic solvents. These solvents work well. When mixed with other liquids and used for biomass pretreatment, these solvents released sugar from grassy feedstocks for fuel and chemical production.

The Impact

The deep eutectic solvents offer a wide range of advantages over other available biomass pretreatment options, such as ionic liquids. The solvents are easy to synthesize due to the wide availability of inexpensive waste lignin. Further, there’s a good potential for significant scale-up of the solvent production process. Lignin is a major component of plant biomass. It is also a major waste stream during biomass processing. Turning waste into an asset makes these renewable solvents an attractive new approach for biomass conversion into biofuels and products that are less expensive. Further, the deep eutectic solvents offer a sustainable alternative to conventional solvents and ionic liquids.

Summary

Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) represent a new class of renewable solvents derived from the conversion of lignin-derived compounds. Naturally found in lignocellulosic biomass, lignin accounts for 20 to 30 percent of the dry weight of biomass. With the development of commercial production of biofuels and bioproducts, it is anticipated that a significant amount of lignin will be generated annually that needs to be converted into desired bioproducts. Thus, lignin valorization is a very important topic for researchers to address to enable the growth of a U.S. bioeconomy. Ten lignin-derived phenolic compounds were tested as hydrogen bond donors in varying mixtures with choline chloride to synthesize deep DESs—solvents that when mixed have a lower melting temperature than the individual solvents. After initial screening, the team selected and used four DESs for biomass pretreatment of switchgrass. The researchers washed the pretreated biomass to remove potential inhibitory effects on enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation. A fresh batch of the DES and choline chloride mixture resulted in approximately 87 percent glucose yield, while recycled DES resulted in decreased yields of 78 percent and 70 percent for second and third rounds, respectively. Biomass processes utilizing these renewable DESs could reduce operating costs by achieving a closed-loop biorefinery that generates the solvents needed for biomass pretreatment from the process of biomass conversion itself.

Contact

BER Program Manager
Kent Peters, Ph.D.
Biological Systems Sciences Division
Office of Biological and Environmental Research
Office of Science
Department of Energy
Kent.Peters@science.doe.gov

Funding

This work was conducted at the Department of Energy (DOE) Joint BioEnergy Institute and supported by the DOE, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research, through a contract between Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and DOE. 

Publications

K.H. Kim, T. Dutta, J. Sun, B. Simmons, and S. Singh, “Biomass pretreatment using deep eutectic solvents from lignin derived phenols.” Green Chemistry 20, 809 (2018). [DOI: 10.1039/C7GC03029K]

Related Links

Joint BioEnergy Institute: http://www.jbei.orgExternal link

Highlight Categories

Program: BER, BSSD, BRCs

Performer/Facility: DOE Laboratory

Last modified: 6/15/2018 4:31:37 PM