Laboratory News

03.25.19From the Labs

Neutrons Paint Atomic Portrait of Prototypical Cell Signaling EnzymeExternal link

Direct observations of the structure and catalytic mechanism of a prototypical kinase enzyme—protein kinase A or PKA—will provide researchers and drug developers with significantly enhanced abilities to understand and treat fatal diseases and neurological disorders such as cancer, diabetes, and cystic fibrosis. Read More »

03.21.19From the Labs

Students Team with Argonne Scientists and Engineers to Learn About STEM CareersExternal link

Argonne hosted the 17th annual Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day (IGED) on Feb. 21. IGED, a diversity outreach program, provides 8th-grade girls with an opportunity to learn about science, technology, engineering and mathematics careers. Engineering and science mentors at Argonne accompanied the girls throughout the day's scheduled activities.
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03.20.19From the Labs

Speeding the Development of Fusion Power to Create Unlimited Energy on EarthExternal link

Can tokamak fusion facilities, the most widely used devices for harvesting on Earth the fusion reactions that power the sun and stars, be developed more quickly to produce safe, clean, and virtually limitless energy for generating electricity? Physicist Jon Menard of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has examined that question in a detailed look at the concept of a compact tokamak equipped with high temperature superconducting (HTS) magnets.
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03.18.19From the Labs

Biosensor May Provide Better Cancer DiagnosisExternal link

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers have developed a new biological sensor that could help clinicians better diagnose cancer and epilepsy.
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03.18.19From the Labs

Researchers Reverse the Flow of Time on IBM's Quantum ComputerExternal link

An international team of scientists led by Argonne explored the concept of reversing time in a first-of-its-kind experiment, managing to return a computer briefly to the past. The results present new possibilities for quantum computer program testing and error correction.
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03.15.19From the Labs

Jefferson Lab Particle Accelerator Quality Testing Facility Is Going Stronger Than Ever After 5,000 TestsExternal link

Thirty years ago, a newly assembled team of scientists, engineers and technicians set out to build the world’s first automated test and qualification facility for superconducting radiofrequency, or SRF, accelerator components. Today, the Vertical Test Area at the Department of Energy’s Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab’) is still going strong, more than 5,000 SRF accelerator component tests later.
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03.15.19From the Labs

Opportunities Abound for Ascending Female ScientistsExternal link

Women have always been critical to the core mission of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory. But never before have they occupied as many leadership positions as they do today. From the environmental sciences to supercomputers, they are shaping some of the lab’s most high-profile and innovative research.
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03.14.19From the Labs

ORNL-led Collaboration Solves a Beta-decay Puzzle with Advanced Nuclear ModelsExternal link

An international collaboration including scientists at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory solved a 50-year-old puzzle that explains why beta decays of atomic nuclei are slower than what is expected based on the beta decays of free neutrons.
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03.14.19From the Labs

Tied in Knots: New Insights Into Plasma Behavior Focus on Twists and TurnsExternal link

Whether zipping through a star or a fusion device on Earth, the electrically charged particles that make up the fourth state of matter better known as plasma are bound to magnetic field lines like beads on a string. Unfortunately for plasma physicists who study this phenomenon, the magnetic field lines often lack simple shapes that equations can easily model. Often they twist and knot like pretzels. Now, findings from an international team of scientists led by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) show that the twisted magnetic fields can evolve in only so many ways, with the plasma inside following a general rule.
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03.14.19From the Labs

New Reactor-liner Alloy Material Offers Strength and ResilienceExternal link

A new tungsten-based alloy developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory can withstand unprecedented amounts of radiation without damage. Essential for extreme irradiation environments such as the interiors of magnetic fusion reactors, previously explored materials have thus far been hobbled by weakness against fracture, but this new alloy seems to defeat that problem.
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Last modified: 2/26/2016 1:21:29 PM