Laboratory News

11.01.18From the Labs

Scientists Make First Detailed Measurements of Key Factors Related to High-temperature SuperconductivityExternal link

Two studies led by SLAC and Stanford capture electron 'sound waves' and identify a positive feedback loop that may boost superconducting temperatures. Read More »

10.31.18From the Labs

Improving Climate Models to Account for Plant Behavior Yields ‘Goodish’ NewsExternal link

Climate scientists have not been properly accounting for what plants do at night, and that, it turns out, is a mistake. A new study from the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has found that plant nutrient uptake in the absence of photosynthesis affects greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere.
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10.31.18From the Labs

SLAC Joins New LaserNetUS Network to Boost High-intensity Laser ResearchExternal link

The Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has joined a new research network called LaserNetUS that aims to boost access to high-intensity laser facilities at labs and universities across the country, including the Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) laser facility at SLAC’s Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS).
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10.30.18From the Labs

A Solar Cell That Does Double Duty for Renewable EnergyExternal link

Rresearchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, a DOE Energy Innovation Hub, have come up with a new recipe for renewable fuels that could bypass the limitations in current materials: an artificial photosynthesis device called a “hybrid photoelectrochemical and voltaic cell” that turns sunlight and water into not just one, but two types of energy – hydrogen fuel and electricity.
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10.25.18From the Labs

Celebrating the 60th Anniversary of Technetium-99mExternal link

The tracer, technetium-99m (Tc-99m), is the radioactive isotope responsible for 80 percent of the nuclear medical imaging procedures performed in the world. Though the element technetium was discovered in the 1930s, it wasn’t readily available for imaging procedures until three Brookhaven researchers—Walt Tucker, Powell “Jim” Richards, and Margaret Greene—developed a way to generate the isotope on the spot in hospitals.
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10.24.18From the Labs

Researchers Switch Material from One State to Another with a Single Flash of LightExternal link

Scientists from the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have demonstrated a surprisingly simple way of flipping a material from one state into another, and then back again, with single flashes of laser light.
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10.22.18From the Labs

ORNL Researcher Kate Page's Athletic Past Accents Value of CollaborationExternal link

Neutron scattering scientist Katharine Page believes in team work – as a staff scientist at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a lead on the DISCOVER project, an IDREAM team member, and a mentor.
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10.22.18From the Labs

Pushing the (Extra Cold) Frontiers of Superconducting ScienceExternal link

Ruslan Prozorov, a physicist at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory, and his research team have developed a method to measure magnetic properties of superconducting and magnetic materials that exhibit unusual quantum behavior at very low temperatures in high magnetic fields.
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10.18.18From the Labs

New Simulations Confirm Efficiency of Waste-removal Process in Plasma DeviceExternal link

Just as fire produces ash, the combining of light elements in fusion reactions can produce material that eventually interferes with those same reactions. Now, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have found evidence suggesting that a process could remove the unwanted material and make the fusion processes more efficient within a type of fusion facility known as a field-reversed configuration (FRC) device. Read More »

10.18.18From the Labs

Fermilab Scientists to Look for Dark Matter Using Quantum TechnologyExternal link

Fermilab’s Aaron Chou is leading a multi-institutional consortium to apply the techniques of quantum metrology to the problem of detecting axion dark matter. Read More »

Last modified: 2/26/2016 1:21:29 PM