Laboratory News

08.01.17From the Labs

Lights! Action! Photo-Activated Catalyst Grabs CO2 to Make Ingredients for FuelExternal link

An international research team led by scientists at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and Nanyang Technological University (NTU) in Singapore have developed a light-activated material that can chemically convert carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide without generating unwanted byproducts.

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07.28.17From the Labs

INL Research Leads to New Discovery on Key Nuclear FuelExternal link

Discoveries from a collaborative project involving researchers at Idaho National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Aix-Marseille University in France have increased our understanding of the thermal and magnetic properties of uranium dioxide, a key component of fuel for nuclear power plants.

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07.27.17From the Labs

Atomic Movies May Help Explain Why Perovskite Solar Cells Are More EfficientExternal link

Experiments with a powerful “electron camera” at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have discovered that light whirls atoms around in perovskites, potentially explaining the high efficiency of these next-generation solar cell materials and providing clues for making better ones.
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07.27.17From the Labs

Strange Electrons Break the Crystal Symmetry of High-Temperature SuperconductorsExternal link

Scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory and Yale University have discovered spontaneous voltage perpendicular to applied current that may help unravel the mystery of high-temperature superconductors.
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07.25.17From the Labs

PPPL Researchers Perform First Basic-Physics Simulation of the Impact of Recycled Atoms on Plasma TurbulenceExternal link

In the first basic-physics attempt to study the atoms’ impact, physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have modeled how the recycled neutrals, which arise when hot plasma strikes a tokamak’s walls, increase turbulence driven by what is called the “ion temperature gradient” (ITG).
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07.21.17From the Labs

Construction Begins on International Mega-Science Experiment to Understand NeutrinosExternal link

Groundbreaking held today in South Dakota marks the start of excavation for the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility, future home to the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. With the turning of a shovelful of earth a mile underground, a new era in international particle physics research officially began today.
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07.19.17From the Labs

3-D Models Help Scientists Gauge Flood ImpactExternal link

Using Titan at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility, a team from University of Iowa performed one of the first highly resolved, 3-D, volume-of-fluid simulations of a dam break in a natural environment. The simulation allowed the team to map precise water levels for actual flood events over time and account for the interaction between the flood wave and large obstacles such as dams or floodplain walls.
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07.19.17From the Labs

Leading the way: ORNL builds more reliable, longer-lasting targets for high-powered neutron scatteringExternal link

Since the Spallation Neutron Source began operation in 2006, engineers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have continued to develop new approaches to target design, seeking unprecedented levels of power for reliable neutron production. As a result, powerful new techniques are expected to emerge for materials research.
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07.18.17From the Labs

Bio-inspired Materials: Borrowing from Nature’s PlaybookExternal link

Nature provides myriad examples of unique materials and structures developed for specialized applications or adaptations. An interdisciplinary group of researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory is trying to unlock the secrets that organisms use to build such complex structures so that power can be used to create materials not found in nature and not capable of being synthesized by conventional means.
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07.18.17From the Labs

Scientists Create First Laboratory Generation of High-Energy Shock Waves that Accelerate Astrophysical ParticlesExternal link

A team of scientists led by Derek Schaeffer, a physicist at Princeton University, have for the first time developed a platform for studying highly energetic shocks with greater flexibility and control than is possible with spacecraft.
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Last modified: 2/26/2016 1:21:29 PM