Science Headlines

04.12.17User Facility

Self-Assembling Polymers Provide Thin Nanowire TemplateExternal link

A team of researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory (DOE), the University of Chicago, and MIT has developed a new way to create some of the world’s thinnest wires, using a process that could enable mass manufacturing with standard types of equipment. Read MoreExternal linkage

04.11.17User Facility

From Moo to Goo: Cooperating Microbes Convert Methane to Alternative Fuel SourceExternal link

Scientists at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a new system to convert methane into a deep green, energy-rich, gelatin-like substance that can be used as the basis for biofuels and other bioproducts, specialty chemicals — and even feed for cows that create the gas in the first place. Read MoreExternal linkage

04.11.17User Facility

How Berkelium Stands Out in a Heavy Metal CrowdExternal link

Using several spectroscopic techniques, scientists at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) found that the element berkelium breaks form with its heavy element peers by taking on an extra positive charge when bound to a synthetic organic molecule. Read MoreExternal linkage

04.11.17User Facility

Brookhaven Lab-Led Research Aims to Develop Protections Against Chemical Warfare AgentsExternal link

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory are participating in a collaborative effort to study how the use of zirconium (Zr)-based metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and niobium (Nb)-based polyoxometalates (POMs) may be effectively used in gas masks to capture and decompose dangerous chemical agents like Sarin, notably used in a subway terrorist attack in Japan in 1995. Read MoreExternal linkage

04.10.17User Facility

Coming to a Lab Bench Near You: Femtosecond X-Ray SpectroscopyExternal link

The ephemeral electron movements in a transient state of a reaction important in biochemical and optoelectronic processes have been captured and, for the first time, directly characterized using ultrafast X-ray spectroscopy at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). Read MoreExternal linkage

04.07.17User Facility

Scientists Watch a Molecule Protect Itself from Radiation DamageExternal link

To increase their understanding of excited state proton transfers in DNA and other molecules, scientists at the LCLS at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory looked at the bonds between atoms neighboring nitrogen and confirmed that optical light breaks the nitrogen-hydrogen bonds. Read MoreExternal linkage

04.07.17From the Labs

Scientists at PPPL Further Understanding of a Process that Causes Heat Loss in Fusion DevicesExternal link

Secondary electron emission - or SEE - cools the edge of plasma in tokamaks and dampens its overall performance; physicists working with the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory recently advanced their understanding on how SEE is affected by different wall materials and structures. Read MoreExternal linkage

04.06.17From the Labs

Skyrmions Created with a Special SpiralExternal link

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have found a way to control the creation of special textured surfaces in magnetically ordered materials. Read MoreExternal linkage

04.06.17User Facility

Computer Simulations of DIII-D Experiments Shed Light on Mysterious Plasma FlowsExternal link

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and General Atomics have simulated a mysterious self-organized flow of the superhot plasma that fuels fusion reactions. Read MoreExternal linkage

04.06.17User Facility

X-Ray Study Reveals Long-Sought Insights Into Potential Drug TargetExternal link

X-ray studies done in part at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have produced surprising insights into the workings of a hormone receptor associated with blood pressure regulation. Researchers believe it could be a target for new medicines related to cardiovascular conditions, neuropathic pain and tissue growth. Read MoreExternal linkage