Science Headlines

05.31.18User Facility

Supercomputers Provide New Window Into the Life and Death of a NeutronExternal link

A team led by scientists in the Nuclear Science Division at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has enlisted powerful supercomputers to calculate a quantity known as the “nucleon axial coupling,” or gA – which is central to our understanding of a neutron’s lifetime – with an unprecedented precision. Read MoreExternal linkage

05.30.18Profile

Faces of Summit: Tackling StorageExternal link

Big supercomputers bring big challenges—especially when it comes to storing all the data such large-scale systems generate. Sarp Oral, the storage team lead for the Technology Integration Group (TechInt) at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF), knows well the struggles and rewards associated with the delivery of a capable file system. Read MoreExternal linkage

05.30.18User Facility

Finding Better Magnets Faster with 3D Metal Printing PrototypingExternal link

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Critical Materials Institute (CMI) used laser 3D metal printing to optimize a permanent magnet material that may make an economical alternative to the more expensive rare-earth neodymium iron boron (NdFeB) magnets in some applications. Read MoreExternal linkage

05.30.18User Facility

New High-Precision Instrument Enables Rapid Measurements of Protein CrystalsExternal link

A team of scientists and engineers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have developed a new scientific instrument that enables ultra-precise and high-speed characterization of protein crystals at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II)—a DOE Office of Science User Facility at Brookhaven, which generates high energy x-rays that can be harnessed to probe the protein crystals. Read MoreExternal linkage

05.29.18User Facility

Neutrons Evaluate Connection Between Cellular Water Dynamics and Cancer Cell BehaviorsExternal link

As scientists and physicians search for new ways to study and understand cancer cells, one approach suggests the movement of water molecules located in these cells could potentially predict the progression of cancerous tumors and measure the potency of anticancer medications in individual patients. Read MoreExternal linkage

05.29.18User Facility

Graphene Layered with Magnetic Materials Could Drive Ultrathin SpintronicsExternal link

Researchers working at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) coupled graphene, a monolayer form of carbon, with thin layers of magnetic materials like cobalt and nickel to produce exotic behavior in electrons that could be useful for next-generation computing applications. Read MoreExternal linkage

05.29.18User Facility

Another First for QuantumExternal link

A multidivisional team consisting of members from ORNL’s Quantum Information Science Group, the Scientific Computing Group (SciComp) at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF), the OLCF’s Computer Science Research Group, and ORNL’s Theoretical Physics Group has become the first group to successfully simulate an atomic nucleus using a quantum computer. Read MoreExternal linkage

05.24.18User Facility

Understanding the Generation of Light-Induced Electrical Current in Atomically Thin NanomaterialsExternal link

Scientists demonstrated that scanning photocurrent microscopy—an imaging capability just added to Brookhaven Lab's Center for Functional Nanomaterials—could provide the optoelectronic information needed to improve the performance of devices for power generation, communications, data storage, and lighting. Read MoreExternal linkage

05.24.18User Facility

Faces of Summit: Putting the System to the TestExternal link

The Faces of Summit series shares stories of people working to stand up America’s next top supercomputer for open science, the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility’s Summit. The next-generation machine is scheduled to come online in 2018. Read MoreExternal linkage

05.23.18User Facility

Newly Discovered Copper and Graphite Combo Could Lead to More Efficient Lithium-ion BatteriesExternal link

A first-of-its-kind copper and graphite combination discovered in basic energy research at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory could have implications for improving the energy efficiency of lithium-ion batteries, which include these components. Read MoreExternal linkage

Last modified: 1/3/2018 12:31:18 PM