User Facility News

11.21.18User Facility

Argonne Adapting Continuous Flow Processing to Complex Nanomaterials to Reduce Manufacturing CostsExternal link

Argonne ​‘s Advanced Synthesis in Continuous Flow Reactor program applies powerful analysis and characterization tools to understand processes at the atomic level to advance manufacturing of fine chemicals and nanosized materials.
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11.21.18User Facility

UEC Profile: ‘An ARM Loyalist’External link

As a graduate student, Pavlos Kollias discovered the allure of millimeter cloud radar, a specialty that he says put him ‘among great minds.’
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11.20.18User Facility

Making X-ray Microscopy 10 Times FasterExternal link

Scientists at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II)—a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility at DOE’s Brookhaven National Laboratory—have developed a transmission x-ray microscope that can image samples 10 times faster than previously possible.
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11.19.18User Facility

Scientists Produce 3-D Chemical Maps of Single BacteriaExternal link

Scientists at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II)—a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility at DOE’s Brookhaven National Laboratory—have used ultrabright x-rays to image single bacteria with higher spatial resolution than ever before
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11.19.18User Facility

Argonne's Pioneering Computing Program Pivots to ExascaleExternal link

When it comes to the breadth and range of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory’s contributions to the field of high-performance computing (HPC), few if any other organizations come close. Argonne has been building advanced parallel computing environments and tools since the 1970s. Today, the laboratory serves as both an expertise center and a world-renowned source of cutting-edge computing resources used by researchers to tackle the most pressing challenges in science and engineering.
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11.16.18User Facility

Climate Simulations Project Wetter, Windier HurricanesExternal link

New supercomputer simulations by climate scientists at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have shown that climate change intensified the amount of rainfall in recent hurricanes such as Katrina, Irma, and Maria by 5 to 10 percent. They further found that if those hurricanes were to occur in a future world that is warmer than present, those storms would have even more rainfall and stronger winds.
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11.16.18User Facility

Symbiosis a Driver of Truffle DiversityExternal link

A team led by Francis Martin and his colleagues at the French National Institute for Agricultural Research, Genoscope, and University of Torino, and including researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute, a DOE Office of Science User Facility, sought insights into the ECM lifestyle of truffle-forming species.
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11.16.18User Facility

X-rays Show How Periods of Stress Changed an Ice Age Hyena to the BoneExternal link

An international team that includes researchers from the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory mapped trace elements within Pleistocene fossils to learn about the life of a long-extinct subspecies of spotted hyena.
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11.15.18User Facility

Scientists Bring Polymers Into Atomic-Scale FocusExternal link

A research team led by Nitash Balsara, a senior faculty scientist in the Materials Sciences Division at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at UC Berkeley, has adapted a powerful electron-based imaging technique to obtain an image of atomic-scale structure in a synthetic polymer.
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11.15.18User Facility

Detecting Light in a Different DimensionExternal link

Scientists from the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN)—a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory—have dramatically improved the response of graphene to light through self-assembling wire-like nanostructures that conduct electricity. The improvement could pave the way for the development of graphene-based detectors that can quickly sense light at very low levels, such as those found in medical imaging, radiation detection, and surveillance applications.
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Last modified: 2/26/2016 1:21:30 PM